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Keeney & Devitts Deed

Deed to property purchased by Alexander, Aaron, and Max Stern. This is one of the buildings destroyed by the 1893 fire. Keeney and Devitts Addition Deed 1891 -Chad Halvorson, Digital History 2012
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Bridges

The history of bridges in the Fargo area is only half the tale. Much like neighbors deciding how to split the cost of labor and materials on a fence, the city of Moorhead had just as much invested into bridge building as Fargo did. Needless to say, the meetings between Fargo and Moorhead officials got heated at times. The back and forth went from petty accusations to downright grudge matches, but in the end it all wo
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Martin Hector

Martin Hector is considered to be one of the most influential pioneers in the City of Fargo. His dedication to the city went above and beyond what was asked of him. Martin lived in Fargo most of his life and died here in 1938. Martin, along with other prominent leaders of Fargo, gave it the push it needed to become the successful city it is today. In 2000, a woman by the name of Susie Yakowics wrote a wonderful artic
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First and Second Session Laws Establishing NDAC

Scanned pages of the laws establishing the North Dakota Agricultural College. 1st Session Laws, 1890 North Dakota Legislative Assembly. 2nd Session Laws, 1891 North Dakota Legislative Assembly. -Rebecca Paton, Digital History 2012  
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Mayors

1875–1876; George Egbert 1876–1877; Evan S. Tyler 1877–1880; George Egbert 1880–1882; Jasper B. Chapin 1882–1883; William A. Kindred 1883–1885; Woodford A. Yerxa 1885–1886; John A. Johnson 1886–1887; Charles Scott 1887–1888; Alanson W. Edwards 1888–1890; Seth Newman 1890–1892; Wilbur F. Ball 1892–1894; Emerson H. Smith 1894–1896; Wilbur F. Ball 1896–1902; John A. Johnson 1902–1904; William D. Sweet The NDSU Archives
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Fargo Fire Images and Music

In 1893, Fargo was struck by a devastating fire. Here is a brief description of the events of the fire, combined with indelible images from the event itself. -Chad Halvorson, Digital History 2012  
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Music in Early Fargo

There were a significant number of thespians, musicians, and other artistic entertainers in Fargo between 1880 and the 1893 destruction.  Music and theater entertainment appears to have been a substantial industry in Fargo.  In 1888, according to the directory there were at least two music stores operating in Fargo.[1]  In addition to this, most theaters ran six nights per week and also had daily rehearsals.  The Vau
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Poetry and the Fargo Fire

This is a slideshow video reading of two poems written by an unknown Fargo resident and J.H. Burke following and regarding the Fargo Fire of 1893. Please click the links below to view video presentations of these poems on YouTube. Please click here for a reading of “Untitled.” “Untitled” “In our peaceful, quiet city, (Oh what a change that day would see,) That seventh day of June, Eighteen hun
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Horace E. Stockbridge

Horace Stockbridge was the first, and youngest, president of North Dakota Agriculture College, which later became North Dakota State University[1]. He was born in Hadley, Massachusetts on May 15, 1857[2]. He attended Massachusetts Agricultural College, where he received his degree in 1878[3]. He had a strong background in agriculture, which was probably why he was picked to be the president. Prior to his acceptance o
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Education in Fargo, North Dakota, 1870-1900

The education system in Fargo in the early stages of the city’s development was heavily rooted in, and influenced, by religion. There were educational centers as early as there were churches. In fact, many churches started schools so they could develop their children’s minds in the way they wanted them to be; so the curriculums were filled with references to the Bible and God. The people of Fargo, N.D., w
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