“An Ordinance Relating to Lighting”

On April 26, 1901 the Supreme Court of the state of North Dakota, in the case of Robert against Fargo Gas & Electric Co and the city of Fargo, ruled that the contract between the city of Fargo and Fargo Gas & Electric Co was void.  This ruling was made by the Supreme Court for reasons that the city charter states that the city cannot make a contract for more than a year.[1]   The contract between Fargo Gas & Electric Co and the city of Fargo was originally created back in 1895.   The terms of the contract was about the construction and management of the city’s new arc lighting street lamps. So by the court ruling the street lights of Fargo were not being powered or managed. In order to solve this problem the City Commissioners Board of Fargo held a special meeting to discuss a plan of action.

A photograph postcard is of Broadway in 1908, looking north from Front Street (Main Avenue).

A photograph postcard is of Broadway in 1908, looking north from Front Street (Main Avenue).

The special meeting was held on April 29, 1901 starting at 5:00 p.m.  During this meeting a committee was created and an ordinance titled “A Ordinance Relating to Lighting”. This meeting was also considered to be the first reading of said ordinance. The second reading of “A Ordinance Relating to Lighting” was on May 6, 1901, and the ordinance was passed.  Bids for the new contract would be decided on a later date.[2]

On May 9, 1901 the City Commissioners Board held bids for the new contract.  This new contract would not only contain the construction and management of street lights, it would also contain the adding of lights to public buildings.  The first to bid for this new contract was the Fargo-Edison Company.  Their bid was for “an all night schedule and a moonlight schedule.”  In addition they would install improved enclosed arc lights that burned 500 watts per hour and have the candle power of 2,000.   The cost to the city of Fargo was $7.45 for each per months for the 66 street lights that were already constructed.  For public buildings, the cost was $.08 per 1,000 watts and would be measured by meters that Fargo Edison Co would install. The term would end August 31, 1901.  The second bid was from the Fargo Gas & Electric Co.   Their bid was for maintaining the street lights currently installed at a cost of $10 per month.  In addition they would install incandescent lamps for the public buildings at $.05 per 1,000 watts.  The bid provided an option to the city of Fargo if it preferred gas lights, Fargo Gas & Electric would install Welsbach Burners and the cost of gas would be at $1.60 per thousand cubic feet.  The commissioner unanimously decided to accept the bid of the Fargo-Edison Co.  The matter of lighting public buildings was referred to the committee on lights. The Fargo-Edison Co. went to work installing the new lights.[3][4]  On May 15, 1901, Mr. Hughes the manger of the Fargo-Edison Co. told the Fargo Forum “that if nothing unforeseen occurs he will have all the lights burning by Saturday night June 15.”[5]

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[1] Fargo Forum, (Fargo, ND) April 26, 1901.

[2] Fargo Forum, (Fargo, ND) April 29, 1901.

[3] Fargo Board of city commissioners, (Fargo, ND) May 9, 1901.

[4] Fargo Forum, (Fargo, ND) May 10, 1901.

[5] Fargo Forum, (Fargo, ND), May 15, 1901.

Repurposing Fargo

Fargo has grown immensely and gone through numerous changes in its 142-year history. Growing from just over 2,500 people in 1880 to over 107,000 today and surviving such natural disasters as fires, floods and tornadoes; nothing has been able to stop Fargo from thriving.

Fargo’s downtown has always been a thriving business mecca[1] of the Red River Valley and is a key reason Fargo has survived to be the city it is today.

Recently, the city of Fargo has begun to restore much of the historic downtown district located along Broadway and Main Street.

The 1970’s were the birth of the “mall” as we know it today. Malls could be seen sprouting out of new developments in cities all across America. These malls drew businesses and shoppers away from downtowns into one central, indoor location. This spelled death for many downtowns across the nation. Fargo was no exception. In the late 70’s, the Red River Mall[2]Red River Mall was implemented on Broadway in an attempt to draw pedestrians to shop at downtown businesses after the opening of the West Acres Mall drew much of the business away from downtown. Broadway was realigned in a zigzag pattern to slow traffic and create a more pedestrian friendly environment. By the mid 1980’s many business owners were voicing their displeasure with the Red River Mall’s design. In 1986 the Mall was dismantled and Broadway was straightened.

For much of the 1990’s and into the early 2000’s, downtown Fargo was a shell of its former glory days. [3] In 1999 the city of Fargo, realizing that its historic downtown was suffering, issued the “Fargo Renaissance Zone Plan.” With lucrative incentives (five-year tax exemptions and tax credits) given to property owners that invested in the rehabilitation of Fargo’s Renaissance Zone, downtown Fargo slowly began to thrive once again.

Downtown Fargo is now a flourishing mix of residential and commercial buildings. Many of the buildings in downtown Fargo date back to the rebuilding of Fargo after the fire of 1893. The 600 block of Main Avenue[4] is the only block of buildings that survived the fire. All of the landmark buildings have gone through some sort of renovation or name change in their history.

Hotel Bison and the Fargoan Hotel are no longer hotels. They now house commercial spaces on the street level and residential living spaces on the upper floors. The Ford Building is no longer assembling cars; it houses commercial spaces and high-end residential condos. Many of the buildings have always housed businesses of some sort. Yet very few of these buildings have remained the same throughout the years. The Merchants National Bank building is now the King House Buffet, and the First National Bank building is now a bar fittingly called Fort Knox.

Two of the most iconic buildings in downtown Fargo that have stood the test of time are the Hotel Donaldson, locally known as the HoDo,[5] and the Fargo Theater. The Hodo was built in 1894 to serve as a meeting hall for the International Order of Odd Fellows. As one of the first buildings built after the fire, the building is a constant reminder of where Fargo came from. In the mid-1910’s, the building officially became the Hotel Donaldson. It has had its rough patches throughout the years, changing ownership and purpose many times, but the heart of the building and its history has survived. The Fargo Theater[6] was built in 1926 as a cinema and vaudeville theater. Originally designed in the Renaissance style, the theater was restored in the 80’s with a more art deco style interior. The Fargo Theater still stands at its original location in downtown Fargo and is a major attraction to this day.

Downtown is once again a must see for anyone visiting Fargo. From its vibrant beginnings, surviving disaster, and period of rough times, downtown Fargo has risen to new heights. The Fargo Street Fair[7] every summer (the largest outdoor event in North Dakota) and Cruisin’ Broadway[8] have become staples of downtown Fargo’s thriving resurgence.

-Logan Kern, Digital History 2012


[1] http://www.lileks.com/fargo/broadway/8.html

[2] http://library.ndsu.edu/fargo-history/broadway/red-river-mall.htm

[3] http://library.ndsu.edu/fargo-history/broadway/broadway2000.htm

[4] http://library.ndsu.edu/fargo-history/front-street-main-avenue/front-street-west-1920.htm

[5] http://www.examiner.com/article/dalefest-returns-to-hodo

[6]http://digitalhorizonsonline.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/uw&CISOPTR=7343&CISOBOX=1&REC=13

[7] http://livability.com/fargo/nd/photos-video

[8] http://downtownfargo.com/index.php/events/

Fargo Churches: Then and Now

This slideshow features historic photographs of several of the churches of Fargo, accompanied by recent photographs, which allow for side-by-side comparison. The recent photographs were taken by Scott Becklund in 2012. Mr. Becklund attempted to recreate the original location and angle of the archival photographs. Most of the churches retain some of their original character, while some have been demolished.[divider scroll]

1. Elim Lutheran Church- 321 9th Street North. (Left) Photo taken from Clara Byers’ Scrapbook, 1937, courtesy of NDSU Archives. (Right) Elim Lutheran Church, 2012. Taken by Scott Becklund.

2. First Congregational Church- 224 8th Street South.  (Left) Photo taken from Clara Byers’ Scrapbook, 1937, courtesy of NDSU Archives. (Right) Site of former First Congregational Church, 2012. Taken by Scott Becklund. None of the original structure remains. It was demolished in 1979.

3. First Presbyterian Church-  650 2nd Avenue North.  (Left) Photo taken from Clara Byers’ Scrapbook, 1937, courtesy of NDSU Archives. (Right) First Presbyterian Church, 2012. Taken by Scott Becklund.

4. Gethsemane Episcopal Church-  204 9th Street South.  (Left) Photo taken from Clara Byers’ Scrapbook, 1937, courtesy of NDSU Archives. (Right) Site of former Gethsemane Episcopal Church, 2012. Taken by Scott Becklund. The cathedral burned beyond repair in 1989.

5. Grace Lutheran Church- 821 5th Avenue South. (Left) Photo taken from Clara Byers’ Scrapbook, 1937, courtesy of NDSU Archives. (Right) Grace Lutheran Church, 2012. Taken by Scott Becklund.

6. Methodist Episcopal Church- 906 1st Avenue South. (Left) Photo taken from Clara Byers’ Scrapbook, 1937, courtesy of NDSU Archives. (Right) First United Methodist Church, 2012. Taken by Scott Becklund.

7. Plymouth Congregational Church- 901 Broadway North.  (Left) Photo Mss 48.1.25, courtesy of NDSU Archives. Taken c. 1920. (Right) Plymouth Congregational Church, 2012. Taken by Scott Becklund.

8. Pontoppidan Lutheran Church- 309 4th Street North. (Left) Photo taken from Clara Byers’ Scrapbook, 1937, courtesy of NDSU Archives. (Right) Pontoppidan Luthean Church, 2012. Taken by Scott Becklund.

9. St. Mark’s English Lutheran Church- 400 Roberts Street. (Left) Photo taken from NDSU Libraries (http://library.ndsu.edu/fargo-history/churches/st-marks-eng-luth.htm). (Right) Site of former St. Mark’s Church. Building was demolished, c. 2000. Photograph by Scott Becklund, 2012.

10. St. Mary’s Catholic Church-  619 7th Street North. (Left) Photo 2023.M-4, courtesy of NDSU Archives. Taken c. 1935. (Right) St. Mary’s Cathedral, 2012. Taken by Scott Becklund.

11. Swedish Baptist Church- 300 4th Street North. (Left) Photo taken from NDSU Libraries (http://library.ndsu.edu/fargo-history/churches/swede-bap.htm). (Right) Site of former Swedish Baptist Church. Photograph by Scott Becklund, 2012.

12. Unitarian Universalist Church- 121 9th Street South.  (Left) Photo 2003.2.3, courtesy of NDSU Archives. Taken c. 1935. (Right) Unitarian Universalist Church, 2012. Taken by Scott Becklund.

-Zach Jendro, Digital History 2012

 

Bridges

The history of bridges in the Fargo area is only half the tale. Much like neighbors deciding how to split the cost of labor and materials on a fence, the city of Moorhead had just as much invested into bridge building as Fargo did. Needless to say, the meetings between Fargo and Moorhead officials got heated at times. The back and forth went from petty accusations to downright grudge matches, but in the end it all worked out and after ten years there were two bridges connecting the twin cities. This is just the beginning of a very long history on the subject.[1]

Northern Pacific Bridge w/Foot Bridge

Northern Pacific Bridge w/Foot Bridge,State Historical Society of North Dakota, Digital ID: shC1653

Soon after the completion of the first bridge, the Northern Pacific Bridge in 1872, a wooden bridge was built that allowed people to cross the river on foot and by wagon. The cost was split between Fargo and Moorhead, and they soon realized it was very expensive to maintain. Laborers had to be paid to remove the bridge in the early spring before the ice began to flow and damaged the pylons supporting the bridge. They also had to pay for maintaining and replacing the rotted and broken pieces of wood damaged by steamboats, weather, and bridge traffic.[2]

The biggest issue concerning cost was the dismantling of the bridge due to steamboats delivering materials and goods up and down river. Because the wooden bridge was so low to the water, steamboat crews or laborers had to be paid to completely remove the bridge to let the steamboats pass.  Depending on how long the steamboat would be, the bridge would have to be replaced as soon as possible to allow for traffic to cross, only to be disassembled again when the steamboat arrived. The bridge also had to be dismantled every spring before the large chunks of ice began to flow.  In May of 1877 the ice flow was very fast and it tore the bridge apart. John Mason, pioneer and businessman, rebuilt the bridge for the last time. This maintenance and dismantling of the wooden bridge took place from 1875 to 1881.[3]

When maintenance stopped on the wooden bridge, a temporary pontoon bridge was put in its place while the sister cities began serious talks about building a permanent bridge across the Red River. Both sides could not agree on the site so they compromised and decided to build two bridges, one off of Front Street and the other off of Northern Pacific Avenue. In 1883, the Front Street Bridge was completed. In the same year, Clay County built a bridge off of Eighth and Ninth Streets. It was two years later, in 1885, that the second bridge was finished on NP Avenue.[4]

By no means is this the complete story of bridges in the Fargo area. The study of bridges in the Fargo has a very long history still waiting to be told.

-Robert Kurtz, Digital History 2012


[1] : “Bridges,” Finding Aid, Fargo, N.D. Council Meeting Minutes, 1875-1910, IRS-NDSU;  David R. Vik, “Early Bridges of Moorhead and Fargo, 1871-1893” (master’s thesis, Moorhead State University, 1984)

[2] David R. Vik, “Early Bridges of Moorhead and Fargo, 1871-1893” (master’s thesis, Moorhead State University, 1984); “Bridges,” Finding Aid, Fargo, N.D. Council Meeting Minutes, 1875-1910, IRS-NDSU

[3] Ibid; Ibid.

[4]“Bridges,” Finding Aid, Fargo, N.D. Council Meeting Minutes, 1875-1910, IRS-NDSU.

Streets

From the city’s conception, Fargo officials have had to struggle with issues dealing with maintaining and funding the city streets. The wet season brought deep ruts in  the sticky North Dakota clay making travel tough and some streets inaccessible. Grading the streets of Fargo began in 1875 and paying for it fell to the citizens. Every male between 21 and 60 years old who was able to work paid with one day’s labor or its cash equivalent. Payment for grading was hard to collect while many worked off their debt, leaving the council inundated with complaints and citizens of Fargo yearning for a solution.[1]

Cedar blocks example from Moorhead, 1894.

Cedar blocks example from Moorhead, 1894. Clay County Historical Society

Many cities in the east began paving with small granite blocks in the mid-1860s. A decade later, brick and wood became the material of choice for paving in the smaller Midwestern towns. In the early 1880s, Fargo began to look at options for paving some of the major city streets only to be confronted with a few more years of public debates on the issue. The argument was over the use of “Phillips round cedar block” or “Stowe ordinary pine block.” Both methods used the same application, but issues with cost, maintenance, longevity, and street ownership were hot topics of discussion.[2]

 

In 1895 the council finally approved the cedar block method of paving. The firm of McDonnell & O’Neil was awarded the contract to pave sections of Front, Northern Pacific, and Broadway streets. Owners of the lots on these sections of streets paid just over $53,000.  The paving was successful, and the city bought a street sweeper the next year. The paving may have taken care of the mud problem, but it did nothing to stop the dust issues. When the street sweeper ran down the paved streets some called it “a menace to health” because it filled “the air . . . with dense clouds of vile dust.”[3]

Over the next several years many more of the streets in Fargo were paved with cedar block. Issues began to arise during the wet season

Street blocks floating in flood of 1897.

Street blocks floating in flood of 1897. [North Dakota University Archives, Digital Id: rs005658]

when the cedar blocks began to turn and sink, making some of the impassable. The flood of 1897 caused major problems for the city when the cedar blocks simply began to float away.  By the early 20th century, the City of Fargo began installing a concrete base under the cedar blocks to aid in the stability of the street.  At the time nothing was done to prevent the blocks from floating away. Eventually concrete became the material of choice for the streets of Fargo.[4]

Street blocks floating in flood

Street blocks floating in flood of 1897. [North Dakota University Archives, Digital ID: rs004660]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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[1]   Carroll Engelhardt, Gateway to the Northern Plains: Railroads and the Birth of Fargo and Moorhead ( Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2007), 261.

[2] Ibid, 261.

[3] “Streets(Paving, Etc.),” Finding Aid, Fargo, N.D. Council Meeting Minutes, 1875-1910, IRS-NDSU; Carroll Engelhardt, 262.

[4]“Streets(Paving, Etc.),” Finding Aid, Fargo, N.D. Council Meeting Minutes, 1875-1910, IRS-NDSU.

Sidewalks

Commercial sidewalks on Front Street (Main st.), 1880

Commercial Sidewalks on Front Street (Main), 1880
North Dakota University Archives, Digital ID: rs000975

Sidewalks were one of the important issues at the top of the “to-do” list that the Fargo City Council had to stay on top of. Wet weather and sticky North Dakota clay played an important role in the urgency of addressing this issue. Most sidewalks were six feet wide, but streets like Broadway, Northern Pacific Avenue, as well as other streets with heavy foot traffic were equipped with ten-foot sidewalks.[1] In 1875 the first sidewalk was built of two-foot wide planks along Front Street from blocks one to six. It was not until 1883 that Fargo saw a boom in sidewalk construction.[2] The council dealt with many complaints concerning sidewalks over the years

Residential sidewalk

Residential sidewalk at 221 13th Street South (University Drive South) during 1897 flood. North Dakota State University, Digital ID: fpl00036

ranging from unfinished sections and poorly constructed walks, to the takeover of weeds. After the 1893 fire, the city council had been somewhat empowered to find a permanent solution to their sidewalk troubles. Even though the first contract was awarded for noncombustible sidewalks in the same year of the fire, most sidewalks were still constructed of wood. It would not be until the start of the twentieth-century when the citizens of Fargo would have cement under their feet. [3]



[1] Carroll Engelhardt, Gateway to the Northern Plains: Railroads and the Birth of Fargo and Moorhead ( Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2007), 261
[2] “Sidewalks,” Finding Aid, Fargo, N.D. Council Meeting Minutes, 1875-1910, IRS-NDSU.
[3] Carroll Engelhardt, 261.

Henry and Mary Hector

Henry and Mary Hector

Henry and Mary Hector sitting on the porch of their home which is known as the first permanent structure in Fargo. Cass County Historical Society, 2007-028-022

In 1878, Henry Hector, just 17 years old, arrived in the Fargo-Moorhead area at the request of his brother Martin and started a grocery business.[1] He lost his store to a fire in 1882, but successfully rebuilt and continued his business.  He served as the president of the Continental Hose Company and represented the Second Ward on the city council. Henry married the sister of his brother’s wife, Mary Paulson. Henry died in 1940 at the age of 79. Today the house is known as the Hector House.[2]



[1] Susie Yakowicz, “Martin Hector: A Pioneer to Remember,” The Fargo Forum, April 30, 2000.

The First Lutheran Church

The First Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church

The building was first built as the First Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church, cornerstone being having been built in May 26, 1895. It was designed by the Hancock brothers, George nd Walter, and served as a church until about 1919, when it was removed and replaced by a funeral home [Courtesy of the North Dakota State University Archives].

Like other religious groups, Lutherans populated the landscape in large numbers, which brought about the need for a communal place of worship.  Members established a church in which they aptly named First Lutheran Church, located in the area of 400 Roberts Street.  The church was built with an open porch and there were several wooden homes built next to this church.

As with most of the other early religious structures, the main and most noticeable consistency was the very large and high steeple; it is as if the churches were made to be seen stretching into the heavens.

This church is different from others in that that it was built with an outer decor consisting of wood frame.  This picture also shows that the surrounding residences were made of both wood and brick, thereby indicating that the skills and trades of many populations were getting supplies from both river and rail.

Most likely, the wood came from mills in Minnesota.  Judging by the original land plot and other historical records,  R.L. Frazee in Frazee, Minnesota, was dedicated to producing lumber and turned out building supplies  that was eventually loaded to rail for the west.  Some of the wood later would be committed to the United States Government to build the First Pony Express as the rails pushed West.

In summary, the first people to form the new community of Fargo were rich in both tradition and a history that they brought from many points of origin all over the world.  With immigration to Fargo also came the traditional beliefs that resonate within each culture and also made a permanent mark on the surrounding community.  Rich with tradition and deep in history, the community of Fargo grew into a stable and robust community greatly influenced by the cultural diversity of immigration and migration.

With diversity came the freedom of religion. The early settlers held the ideals of western movement and ultimately established a similar base of faith and beliefs that  grew quickly and expanded the country from coast to coast; faith and religion were very important in each and every landscape that marked progression from the Fargo area to the Puget Sound.

As testaments to the faiths that motivated early settlers, their beliefs never faltered and many of the early churches still carry on the traditions of their interpretation of religious and today’s skyline still holds their steeples in our prayers and in the community’s sites.

Rusty Ouart, Digital History 2012

The First Methodist Church, 1874

The First Methodist Church, 1909

The First Methodist Church, pictured here in 1909, was preceded by the congregation’s original building constructed in 1874 [Courtesy of the State Historical Society of North Dakota]

First, this picture of the First Methodist Church indicates that it was built in a dense growth of older trees.  This would indicate that it was taken close to water and not deep into the prairie.  Therefore, there was no retreat for the early settlers of Fargo if faced with outside threats.

Next, the windows are exposed and remarkably made of stained glass.  Not only were the new settlers resilient, but they showed that they had less common resources like stained glass.

This picture also indicates that many church builders chose structures with wood frames and concrete footings and were not primitive; they even used mortar and expensive brick. For example, the First Methodist Church (pictured above) located on Broadway represents a religious building with a steeple and the entrance is on the right front side of the exterior.

Also, the attention to detail at this time in history shows how fast the growth escalated and progressed.  According to the photograph, communication lines are running, thereby demonstrating a significant measure of growth within a relatively short period of time.

Knowing that from 1871 to the date of this 1909 picture, the  38 years from rail and working treaties, it is obvious that the progress of making the small prairie tent city to one that now holds such infrastructure such as concrete and brick facades and a diversity of churches is quite a remarkable feat.  The city of Fargo by 1909 was full of bustling populations and advanced architecture of brick churches highlighted congregations’ dedication to their individual heritage and the diverse backgrounds in the growing city.First United Methodist scott_01

Rusty Ouart, Digital History 2012

Gethsemane Cathedral

Gethsemane Cathedral photo

When Episcopal Bishop William D. Walker was appointed, he chose Fargo as his See City and Gethsemane Church became Gethsemane Cathedral.  In 1893, the church was located on the southeastern corner of Second Avenue and Ninth Street South and had 175 members. The Rev. F.B. Nash Jr. was the rector.  The building was the only wooden Episcopal cathedral in the United States.[1]Gethsemane

 Heather Brinkman, Digital History 2012


[1] Caron, John. “Fargo, N.D., History Exhibition, Institute for Regional Studies, NDSU.” Fargo, N.D., History  Exhibition, Institute for Regional Studies, NDSU. North Dakota State University, 2004. Web. 30 Oct. 2012

 

The Unitarian Church

Unitarian church photo

The Unitarian Church was organized in February of 1890.

It was located on the corner of Ninth Street South and Second Avenue.

This photo was taken in 1899 and Richmond Fisk, D.D. was the minster at the time.[1]Unitarian Church

Heather Brinkman, Digital History 2012


[1] Caron, John. “Fargo, N.D., History Exhibition, Institute for Regional Studies, NDSU.” Fargo, N.D., History  Exhibition, Institute for Regional Studies, NDSU. North Dakota State University, 2004. Web. 30 Oct. 2012 <http://library.ndsu.edu/fargo-history/churches/unitarian.htm>

 

St. Mark’s English Lutheran Church

Rev. Ulery photo
St. Mark's English Lutheran ChurchRev. W.F. Ulery came to Fargo in 1885 to start a Lutheran church whose services were done in English as all of the services offered in the area where in the people’s native tongues.  He persuaded the Southern Railway Depot to allow him to use their building to teach Sunday School.  During his two years of teaching Sunday school he raised the $2,000 needed to build a church proper on a three lots on the corner of 8th street and 4th Ave north.  The construction on the church started on July 25, 1886 and the first service was held on May 18, 1887.  There were 10 members of the congregation at that time.[1]St marks English Lutheran_01

Heather Brinkman, Digital History 2012


[1] Caron, John. “Fargo, N.D., History Exhibition, Institute for Regional Studies, NDSU.” Fargo, N.D., History  Exhibition, Institute for Regional Studies, NDSU. North Dakota State University, 2004. Web. 30 Oct. 2012 <http://library.ndsu.edu/fargo-history/churches/st-marks-eng-luth.htm>

 

Pontoppidan Lutheran Church

Pontoppidan Church

On December 14, 1877 25 charter members met in the home of G. Johnson to organize this church and came up with the name Pontoppidan Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Lutheran Congregation.  The name was changed in 1878 to the First Scandinavian Evangelical Lutheran Church in Fargo and changed again only a month later to Pontoppidan Scandinavian Evangelical Lutheran Church.  The foundation of the church was laid in August 1878 at 415 3rd Street North and was completed in the fall of 1879.  It was lost in the fire of 1893.[1]Pontoppidan

Heather Brinkman, Digital History 2012

[1] Caron, John. “Fargo, N.D., History Exhibition, Institute for Regional Studies, NDSU.” Fargo, N.D., History  Exhibition, Institute for Regional Studies, NDSU. North Dakota State University, 2004. Web. 30 Oct. 2012 <http://library.ndsu.edu/fargo-history/churches/pontoppidan.htm<

 

Plymouth Congregational Church

Plymouth Congregational Church photo

 On April 25, 1885 the Plymouth Congregational Church was organized by Revered William Ewing.  The congregation had 10-12 original members, but by 1893 it had grown to 50 members with Reverend A.H. Tebbets as its pastor.  Reverend O.C. Clark built the first church on Ninth Ave North near Tenth Street, but the building was moved to the west side of Broadway between 8th ave and 9th ave in 1884. That building was blown down on July 7, 1980 by a gale.  The church was rebuilt again at a cost of $3000 and was dedicated on December 21, 1890.  [1]Plymouth Congregational_01

Heather Brinkman, Digital History 2012

[1] Caron, John. “Fargo, N.D., History Exhibition, Institute for Regional Studies, NDSU.” Fargo, N.D., History  Exhibition, Institute for Regional Studies, NDSU. North Dakota State University, 2004. Web. 30 Oct. 2012 < http://library.ndsu.edu/fargo-history/churches/plymouth-cong.htm>